Don’t tell them, show them

This is part five of a multi-part “More from media” series.

One of the things that can separate a good how-to story from a great one is the difference between telling someone (the writer and the audience) how to do something and showing a person how to do it.

Bernie Schultz

Bernie Schultz explains a technique to an audience.

We all learn more and better from a good demonstration, and that includes outdoor writers and communicators. If you have a special technique you want to share, be sure to show it and not just tell it.

Your job as a pro staff angler is very simple: sell product. If you are not helping your sponsor sell product, you are not doing your job. Winning tournaments, getting media exposure and being a traveling billboard are all part of the game, and sometimes they make a difference to the bottom line, but nothing can replace a solid demonstration of a product or technique. Whenever you have a chance to do a meaningful demonstration, take it.

Why? Because it will mean more to your audience. It will make a greater impression. It will sell product.

If your demonstration uses small, relatively inexpensive items (like fishing lures), make sure that you carry plenty of samples around as demo kits. If your sponsor is smart (and not exceptionally cheap), they’ll be happy to give them to you. They’re inexpensive props and tools that will help to sell product.

And if your sponsor is too cheap or too dumb to create these demo/media kits, do it yourself. Nothing sells like a story told well, and nothing tells a story like a real demonstration.

So when do you offer your demo? Whenever you have the chance!

You certainly want to do the demo when you’re being interviewed by a media person, but what about when you’re onstage at a tournament weigh-in and you’ve just had an absolutely stellar day (don’t do it when you’re mediocre or worse)? That’s the perfect time to tell and teach the audience about a method and a sponsor’s product.

Get the message out there. Make some sales. Don’t just tell … show!

Keepers

  1. Make sure media and fans are actually learning by showing them what to do and how to do it.
  2. Create a media kit for key baits and techniques.
  3. Sell, sell, sell!!!
Ken Duke is the managing editor of Fishing Tackle Retailer and the author of two books on bass fishing. He has 33 years of experience working in a multitude of media platforms, and he’s arguably the most knowledgeable stat guy in the sport.

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Author: Ken Duke

[author] [author_image timthumb='on']http://181.224.139.98/~proangle/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/duke_mug_60x60.jpg[/author_image] [author_info]Ken Duke is the managing editor of Fishing Tackle Retailer and the author of two books on bass fishing. He has 33 years of experience working in a multitude of media platforms, and he’s arguably the most knowledgeable stat guy in the sport.[/author_info] [/author]

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